Selen Dar

Muscle-Building Workout and Diet


Subtitles can be changed to different languages, or turned off by clicking the CC icon twice. On todays today’s chest workout I’m gonna be
focusing a lot on my upper portion of the chest. Many of these exercises
that you’re going to see today are all to perform one job, and that’s to put a lot of the
stress on the upper region of the chest. So you’re not going to see as much of
the typical bench presses, cable or dumbbell flys. This is more about
variation and principles, training sets within those exercises. The first
exercise here: Upper chest, but instead of sat down onto that incline bench, I’m
actually stood up and I have the bench raised up at a higher incline than I
would normally. The purpose of this is using a narrower grip as opposed to a
standard overhand grip, a lot more of the tension, I feel, is on the upper region
of the chest. This is very different than if I’m
performing an incline or a flat bench, and I’ve got the weight more evenly
dispersed across the full width of my pectorals. The purpose of this, like I
said, is to focus more on the upper region of the chest having to manage
more of that work, so there’s more stress being placed on the upper pectroals. Yes,
there is a lot of the anterior delt coming in, but that’s part of, sort of
that chest shoulder complex, so I’m okay working the front deltoid, as long as
I’m getting a lot of that tension and a great pump in my upper chest. You saw
also on here, I’m progressively taking the weights up on each set: 10, 15- 20
percent at most, and then I’m using the drop set for that final working set: five
or six heavy reps, I’m taking a good portion of that weight off, dropping it
down by about thirty percent and then just doing as much as I’ve got left with
that focus of contracting and squeezing the chest at the top. Give this a try. Now,
let’s move on have a look at exercise #2. Nothing new here as far as an
incline dumbbell press, but you’ll notice that I’m starting on a pretty steep
incline, fairly heavy weights pushing me towards failure along that seventh or
eighth rep, and then each set I’m having about 30-40 seconds rest in between. I’m
gonna drop the bench down just one click so there’s about five sets and that
incline all the way down to near flat. I’m gonna stick with the same weight, so
what I’m doing here is working the chest through a much larger range of motion
that I would if I’m stuck on a set incline, and either sticking at the same
weight or progressively taking the weight up. You’ll see on this
one I’m using the same weight all of the time, until that finally drop-set, so
really I’m allowing fatigue to catch me, I’m not trying to increase the weight,
because it starts off really tricky up at the the top and as I lower that bench down
to a more of a horizontal plane, it becomes easier but I’m also more
fatigued so it’s kind of finding that balance point between it. My chest is
feeling really pumped, I’ve worked it from an incline all the way down towards
a flat. Full range of motion, bringing that dumbbell all the way down
towards my chest. A really great stretch here, and as I extend my arm back
up I’m consciously squeezing and engaging my chest up at the top. That
final drop set – I reach my failure. I’m going to drop the bench down to an
absolute flat and then just rep out with a 50 pound dumbbell going down from a 75
pound dumbbell. Chest has been worked through a lot of different angles now, a lot of different
ranges, it’s feeling good, now I’m going to move on, focus on some isolation
exercises before I start to incorporate in some flys from various angles and
different weights and methods, so let’s go check it out. So with exercise number three, this is an Iso-Lateral, Incline Press Hammer
Strength, basically I’m doing a machine press but I’m isolating one side at a
time. The benefit of this I find is that by
positioning my body slightly inwards to that arm, I’m able to really feel the
inner and upper region of the chest having much deeper contractile
tension as I extend up. I also find it very good for working through a sticking
point, if like me you’ve ever done a a bench press or a dumbbell press and
you find that as you start to extend through and flex the elbow you get that
sticking point where you often need a helping hand to push you past. I feel
that this machine, depending on how low you have a seat and for me I have
it probably lower than most, so I’m pushing upwards slightly, it’s really
working the the ligaments and getting that angle when I have to push through
that sticking point. So towards the end of my working set I do a drop set. I
actually start out with as heavy as I can manage for about ten quarter reps. So
I’m only working through a limited range of motion. All the way down, extending up
until my elbow comes past my chest, and then back down.
That really pushes me beyond my threshold. I then drop the weight, full
extension at the arm. It gives me a tremendous pump in my chest.
Another great thing I love about using machines within the chest workout is
that they do offer a fixed range of motion, so I’m not having to involve
other muscle group that I work when I’m doing a free weight exercises, or even
cable. The great thing about this particular chest workout, I’m
incorporating a lot of free weights, machines, I’m isolating, I’m using
compound multi-joint lifts. There’s a whole range of variety and different training
principles incorporated into this routine to fully ensure and work in the
overall chest but also focusing more on the upper portion of the chest and using
a lot of drop sets and rest pauses to be able to push past that threshold and push it up a little bit more.
We’re about half way through the workout. It’s going really well so far, I’m going to move on and start to focus on
dumbbell flys, and add in a circuit back and forth with that exercise as well, so let’s get to it. So now with three presses out the way, I’ve got a lot of blood pooled into my chest Feeling really good with that extension, I now need to incorporate some flys in, which is the natural movement of the pectorals.
This kind of wing-like, or tree-hug action. My focus here is to really focus on the outer portion of the chest. Which is when the chest is opened out to its fullest. So instead of doing straight sets of open and close, I’m actually going to focus first on the lower-quarter movement. Opening the weight all the way out, and going fairly heavy on here. Actually, heavy enough that I can’t fully close my arms up. So I’m opening within that first third of the movement. Pulsing if you like, but I’m controlling each rep. 7, 8 reps here.
you see by the second work set, I’ve included a drop set.
So after I’ve maxed out as much as I can manage with that that’s a really good stretch here, you
see my elbow is slightly bent therefore it’s the pectoral doing the work. If I lengthen out my arm, my triceps become activated and it’s going to take some tension away
from the chest, so it’s important if your focus is on that outer region, so
always keep a slight bend in the elbow and not fully extend the arm.
First working set really working that lower third of movement as heavy as
I can. Second working set we’re going to do the same,
but add the drop set in, lower the weight down, and then fully close up my arms,
get that nice full range of motion through the stretch, and that peak contraction
up top, which I’m not getting on the first work set. And then for the third work set, include a tri-set
or an additional drop set where I’ll also increase the angle of the bench, which
works my chest through a larger range of motion, different angles than just by sticking
with the flat bench. So 2 more exercises left, I’m going to superset these with some
parallel bar dips, and tie them in with some cable flys. Final superset here: Parallel bar dips which, I
know many people think it’s probably for the triceps. It is, or it can be a great
triceps exercise, however, by tilting forwards at the waist,
you put a lot of that emphasis on the lower region of the chest, so you’re kind of
projecting your chest down, and as you push back up, actively squeezing your chest
together. It’s technically more of a chest exercise than a tricep exercise. So I’m
super setting the parallel bar dips, sometimes adding a weight, whether it’s a dip belt, or as
you see with the dumbbell in between my legs, this makes it easy to include a drop
set within the exercise, I simply just remove that weight, or let it fall down, and
then carry on with my body weight acting as the resistance. Moving on to the cable
flys, I’ve opted for a machine-type cable fly, (fixed cable fly), to really
focus and isolate that fly-type movement However, I am still changing up the angle and doing some high flys, Even some lower, and also mid fly’s. So that’ll be my main tip here: regardless
whether you’re doing it with a free-range cable fly, or a fixed cable
fly machine, like I’m doing it here vary the angle of the fly, don’t just
stick always with this one. Angle it upwards, take it down. If the cable
machine has movable arms, then you can bend forwards and bring the hands underneath the chest. Another great exercise there.
Three sets here, I’m not really worrying too much about the reps, this is at the
end of the chest workout so I’m just looking to get the most out of each rep.
And really focus on that contraction, the squeeze at the end, and that full range
of motion. So lots of different variations within this chest workout, I’m
not saying that you should follow every exercise as I’ve done.. This video is
really just to showcase the many of the exercises that I’ll either use within my
workout, or I’ll alternate, so be sure to check out more on my Facebook, I’ve got a lot more
videos on there, and you’ve got links to the full article so you can actually look and
study each exercise, start to finish and make sure that you’re performing it correctly. (link to article in comments below). Ok guys, thanks for watching keep bye guys thanks for watching, make sure you have
subscribed for new videos coming every week so check those out, I’ll be back
soon, take care.

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